Brough Patrol

 

Group 9 was Commanded by Lt William Cross JCKS/48/3 DOB 01/01/1903, an agricultural Worker at Everthorpe. His Assistant Group Commander was 2lt James Henry Harrop JCCD/8/1 DOB 19/07/1914 an Aircraft Draughtsman. The Group Sgt Clerk was Sgt John Leonard Cross JCKS/48/4 DOB 17/05/1904.

 

Patrol Members

 

                    Name                                                                                                          I/D No                                Occupation                                                          Date of Birth

 

Sgt Alan Ritson Scott       

JCCE/5/8

Aircraft Draughtsman

06/02/1903

Pte Robert Highton Adie

JCCG/282/5

Aircraft Draughtsman

30/09/1911

Pte William Dashwood Beveridge

SJYW/166/1

Aircraft Draughtsman

05/01/1910

Pte Thomas Cochrane Campbell

STPA/96/1

Aircraft Draughtsman

11/08/1899

Pte Stephen Cecil Woodward

SJYR/137/1

Aircraft Draughtsman

30/04/1902

       

Earlier Members of the Patrol:

     

Pte Ronald Sinclair Massey       

JCCG/165/4 

 Aircraft Stress Analyst

11/02/1916

Pte Alec Jeffrey

 

 

                                    Pte Massey an Aircraft Stress Analyst was later a Sgt in the South Cave Patrol

 

Patrol Targets

The Brough Patrol was controlling major Roads and Railway Lines out of Hull and for observing River Traffic on the River Humber. With all the Patrol Members employed at the Blackburn Aircraft Factory then the Intimate Knowledge of the adjoining Airfield would of come in very handy in the event of the it being captured by Enemy forces.

Patrol Operations Base

It is said that the Patrol had a crude OB in the Stockbridge Plantation at the junction of Cave Road and Stockbridge Lane. This will always have to be classed as hearsay due to the fact that the area is heavily built on now and confirmation of the location cannot happen. A new OB was built by Canadian Soldiers in Dale Plantation, North of the village of Welton. Under heavy secrecy the Canadians built a standard OB for this part of the Country, being a nissen type construction with a entry shaft and escape tunnel. After the War the Engineers came and destroyed the OB with explosives, today only the impressions of the structure exist but it is not hard to see the layout. Evidence of bricks, vent pipes and concrete abound the area around the depressions and just 30 feet from the OB is a depression that has been said was the Explosive/Ammunition Store. Our guide Dave told me a story of when he was a child during the war that every week an Army lorry would arrive in the centre of the village and drop off a container near the village green. Two men in uniform would walk from the direction of the road to the OB and collect the box, at no time was their any contact between the driver and mate and two Auxiliary Members. they would pick up the box which seemed heavy to Dave and walk back up the road, only then would the lorry drive away. 

NB This Operations Base is on Private Land, The Hull&ER@ War Team had the permission of the Landowner to survey the structure

 

The Area of the Entrance shaft

 

View across the top of the OB towards the Entry Shaft

 

 

Another shot across the top

 

Pieces of Ironwork in the Entry Shaft area

 

An L shaped piece of concrete that could well be the top of the Escape Shaft/tunnel

 

Another view from the escape tunnel across towards the entry shaft

The Area of the Explosive/Ammunition Store

 

 

 

Traces of brickwork and pieces of Vent pipe are around the site. Here typical glazed pipe used for vent pipes in East Yorkshire

 

With Special Thanks for an enjoyable day go to Dave Parker of Welton