The Auxiliary Units, Special Duties Section and Scout Sections

1940 - 1944

East Riding of Yorkshire Auxiliary Units

The German High Command had given serious thought to invade England on the East Coast and undertook detailed studies of the coast showing defences, beaches and key military installations. Captured documents called “Militargeographische Einzelangalsen Uber Nordest-England” (Military Geographic Targets in North England) show how serious they looked at the Eastern Coast for an Invasion Plan. The British High Command too took this threat very seriously and we can see this even today in the amount of heavy coastal anti invasion defence structures we have on this coast and the fact that we have many underground Operational Bases (OB’s) just inland from the Coast. We can see from the Unit Members lists, local Farmers and their workers feature prominently as Unit Members as they had detailed knowledge of their local land.

These Patrols were not to meet an invading force head on and would go to ground immediately into their OB as an invasion was happening, they would then wait for the invading force to move over the top of them and would then come out to attack their supply lines, destroy bridges, assisinate high ranking German Oficers and also our own People who callaborated with the Germans. Each Patrol was issued with a silenced .22 rifle for this very reason.

Captain Peter Hollis, East Yorkshire's first Intelligence Officer


The Intelligence Officer in the area of East Yorkshire was a Peter Hollis, son of the Vicar of Hornsea, Canon Hollis. Captain Hollis had volunteered for the Territorial Army in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1939 at the age of 19. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in May 1940 and following the Dunkirk Operation volunteered for the role as Intelligence Officer. His first HQ was at Benningholme Hall near Skirlaugh which was moved to Rise in the grounds of Rise Hall. The HQ was again moved to Middleton Hall, Middleton on the Wolds, which was ideally placed as the central point within the County and provided a training area where a lot Unit Members remember undertaking Training. Captain Hollis controlled the area as far as the Village of Bainton and North of this came under the control of the North Yorkshire Groups under Captain Atkinson.

In 1942 after the East Yorkshire organisation was established Captain Hollis volunteered for service in the East African Rifles in Kenya after which Captain Terry Leigh-Lye took over the role of Intelligence Officer up until June 1944. It is interesting to note that Captain Leigh-Lye was cashiered by Court Martial before the Standown. Within East Yorkshire there were two areas known as Northern and Southern Groups with a total of 34 Patrols.

The Special Duties Section or Branch was a network of Civilian Radio Operators transmitting from Underground Bunkers, or sheds, attics and even Church Alters. They were given messages in Secret Dead Letter drops from the Auxiliary Unit Patrols and transmitted on for use by GHQ Home Forces in defence of the Country. East Yorkshire had Several of these outstations manned by Civilians who would transmit until they were either captured or killed.

The Scout Sections were Regular Servicemen seconded to the Auxiliary Units who were basically Training Staff and in the event of an invasion would themselves revert to being a Patrol Unit and staybehind force. They were only one step ahead of the Auxiliary Units in their Training due to them having to learn everything first before Training the Aux Units.

 

 

East Riding of Yorkshire Auxiliary Units

The German High Command had given serious thought to invade England on the East Coast and undertook detailed studies of the coast showing defences, beaches and key military installations. We can see that from recovered documents that the German High Command undertook detailed studies of the North East Coast of possible Invasion Beaches and Defences along our Coast. Captured documents called “Militargeographische Einzelangalsen Uber Nordest-England” (Military Geographic Targets in North England) show how serious they looked at the Eastern Coast for an Invasion Plan. The British High Command too took this threat very seriously and we can see this even today in the amount of heavy coastal anti invasion defence crust we have on this coast and the fact that we have many OB’s just inland from the Coast. We can see from the Unit Members lists, local Farmers and their workers feature prominently as Unit Members as they had detailed knowledge of their local land.

The Intelligence Officer in the area of East Yorkshire was a Peter Hollis, son of the Vicar of Hornsea, Canon Hollis. Captain Hollis had volunteered for the Territorial Army in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1939 at the age of 19. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in May 1940 and following the Dunkirk Operation volunteered for the role as Intelligence Officer. His first HQ was at Benningholme Hall near Skirlaugh which was moved to Rise in the grounds of Rise Hall. The HQ was again moved to Middleton Hall, Middleton on the Wolds, which was ideally placed as the central point within the County and provided a training area where a lot Unit Members remember undertaking Training. Captain Hollis controlled the area as far as the Village of Bainton and North of this came under the control of the North Yorkshire Groups under Captain Atkinson.

In 1942 after the East Yorkshire organisation was established Captain Hollis volunteered for service in the East African Rifles in Kenya after which Captain Terry Leigh-Lye took over the role of Intelligence Officer up until June 1944. It is interesting to note that Captain Leigh-Lye was cashiered by Court Martial before the Standown.

Within East Yorkshire there were two areas known as Northern and Southern Groups with a total of 34 Patrols.

- See more at: http://www.coleshillhouse.com/east-yorkshire-auxiliary-units-and-operational-bases-the-british-resistance.php#sthash.iEe0gxkx.dpuf

 

East Riding of Yorkshire Auxiliary Units

The German High Command had given serious thought to invade England on the East Coast and undertook detailed studies of the coast showing defences, beaches and key military installations. We can see that from recovered documents that the German High Command undertook detailed studies of the North East Coast of possible Invasion Beaches and Defences along our Coast. Captured documents called “Militargeographische Einzelangalsen Uber Nordest-England” (Military Geographic Targets in North England) show how serious they looked at the Eastern Coast for an Invasion Plan. The British High Command too took this threat very seriously and we can see this even today in the amount of heavy coastal anti invasion defence crust we have on this coast and the fact that we have many OB’s just inland from the Coast. We can see from the Unit Members lists, local Farmers and their workers feature prominently as Unit Members as they had detailed knowledge of their local land.

The Intelligence Officer in the area of East Yorkshire was a Peter Hollis, son of the Vicar of Hornsea, Canon Hollis. Captain Hollis had volunteered for the Territorial Army in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1939 at the age of 19. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in May 1940 and following the Dunkirk Operation volunteered for the role as Intelligence Officer. His first HQ was at Benningholme Hall near Skirlaugh which was moved to Rise in the grounds of Rise Hall. The HQ was again moved to Middleton Hall, Middleton on the Wolds, which was ideally placed as the central point within the County and provided a training area where a lot Unit Members remember undertaking Training. Captain Hollis controlled the area as far as the Village of Bainton and North of this came under the control of the North Yorkshire Groups under Captain Atkinson.

In 1942 after the East Yorkshire organisation was established Captain Hollis volunteered for service in the East African Rifles in Kenya after which Captain Terry Leigh-Lye took over the role of Intelligence Officer up until June 1944. It is interesting to note that Captain Leigh-Lye was cashiered by Court Martial before the Standown.

Within East Yorkshire there were two areas known as Northern and Southern Groups with a total of 34 Patrols.

- See more at: http://www.coleshillhouse.com/east-yorkshire-auxiliary-units-and-operational-bases-the-british-resistance.php#sthash.iEe0gxkx.dpuf

East Riding of Yorkshire Auxiliary Units

The German High Command had given serious thought to invade England on the East Coast and undertook detailed studies of the coast showing defences, beaches and key military installations. We can see that from recovered documents that the German High Command undertook detailed studies of the North East Coast of possible Invasion Beaches and Defences along our Coast. Captured documents called “Militargeographische Einzelangalsen Uber Nordest-England” (Military Geographic Targets in North England) show how serious they looked at the Eastern Coast for an Invasion Plan. The British High Command too took this threat very seriously and we can see this even today in the amount of heavy coastal anti invasion defence crust we have on this coast and the fact that we have many OB’s just inland from the Coast. We can see from the Unit Members lists, local Farmers and their workers feature prominently as Unit Members as they had detailed knowledge of their local land.

The Intelligence Officer in the area of East Yorkshire was a Peter Hollis, son of the Vicar of Hornsea, Canon Hollis. Captain Hollis had volunteered for the Territorial Army in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1939 at the age of 19. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in May 1940 and following the Dunkirk Operation volunteered for the role as Intelligence Officer. His first HQ was at Benningholme Hall near Skirlaugh which was moved to Rise in the grounds of Rise Hall. The HQ was again moved to Middleton Hall, Middleton on the Wolds, which was ideally placed as the central point within the County and provided a training area where a lot Unit Members remember undertaking Training. Captain Hollis controlled the area as far as the Village of Bainton and North of this came under the control of the North Yorkshire Groups under Captain Atkinson.

In 1942 after the East Yorkshire organisation was established Captain Hollis volunteered for service in the East African Rifles in Kenya after which Captain Terry Leigh-Lye took over the role of Intelligence Officer up until June 1944. It is interesting to note that Captain Leigh-Lye was cashiered by Court Martial before the Standown.

Within East Yorkshire there were two areas known as Northern and Southern Groups with a total of 34 Patrols.

- See more at: http://www.coleshillhouse.com/east-yorkshire-auxiliary-units-and-operational-bases-the-british-resistance.php#sthash.iEe0gxkx.dpuf

East Riding of Yorkshire Auxiliary Units

The German High Command had given serious thought to invade England on the East Coast and undertook detailed studies of the coast showing defences, beaches and key military installations. We can see that from recovered documents that the German High Command undertook detailed studies of the North East Coast of possible Invasion Beaches and Defences along our Coast. Captured documents called “Militargeographische Einzelangalsen Uber Nordest-England” (Military Geographic Targets in North England) show how serious they looked at the Eastern Coast for an Invasion Plan. The British High Command too took this threat very seriously and we can see this even today in the amount of heavy coastal anti invasion defence crust we have on this coast and the fact that we have many OB’s just inland from the Coast. We can see from the Unit Members lists, local Farmers and their workers feature prominently as Unit Members as they had detailed knowledge of their local land.

The Intelligence Officer in the area of East Yorkshire was a Peter Hollis, son of the Vicar of Hornsea, Canon Hollis. Captain Hollis had volunteered for the Territorial Army in the East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1939 at the age of 19. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in May 1940 and following the Dunkirk Operation volunteered for the role as Intelligence Officer. His first HQ was at Benningholme Hall near Skirlaugh which was moved to Rise in the grounds of Rise Hall. The HQ was again moved to Middleton Hall, Middleton on the Wolds, which was ideally placed as the central point within the County and provided a training area where a lot Unit Members remember undertaking Training. Captain Hollis controlled the area as far as the Village of Bainton and North of this came under the control of the North Yorkshire Groups under Captain Atkinson.

In 1942 after the East Yorkshire organisation was established Captain Hollis volunteered for service in the East African Rifles in Kenya after which Captain Terry Leigh-Lye took over the role of Intelligence Officer up until June 1944. It is interesting to note that Captain Leigh-Lye was cashiered by Court Martial before the Standown.

Within East Yorkshire there were two areas known as Northern and Southern Groups with a total of 34 Patrols.

- See more at: http://www.coleshillhouse.com/east-yorkshire-auxiliary-units-and-operational-bases-the-british-resistance.php#sthash.iEe0gxkx.dpuf